Hi there, I'm Samantha. I've been cosplaying for about 8 years, and mainly attend conventions in central Florida.

I work for Action3 Events and serve as their cosplay events coordinator for Tampa Bay Comic Con, Orlando Comic Expo, Nashville Comic Expo and possibly more events in the future!

Although I do not purport to be an expert in making things, I am more than happy to answer any cosplay/crafting questions you may have.

I was recently asked by Action3 to make a Fanpage, and if you want, you can like it here. However, this Tumblr is the best way to keep up with my antics, unless you want to actually add my personal profile on Facebook. I'm not shy about adding friends there so feel free to send me a request IF we have met or at least have mutual friends: "Samantha Petrone"

AO3
(I write fics sometimes)

Deviant Art

Cosplay.com

My Better Half

 

kirarhian:

Fully lined Ravenclaw Robe with wand pocket commission for someone at work. This will be worn to LeakyCon.

Finally a couple of progress photos of Scarlett Witch to be work Saturday of Tampa Bay Comic Con

So my Marvel Girl boots that I ordered with emergency-fast shipping are perfect. A little small in the calf but they will work. The gloves are far too dark, though. I’m going to just run to the wig shop and pick some up on my way out to Tampa on Thursday because I’m pretty sure my local one has yellow. If not then idk wtf I’m gonna do ugh.

So my Marvel Girl boots that I ordered with emergency-fast shipping are perfect. A little small in the calf but they will work. The gloves are far too dark, though. I’m going to just run to the wig shop and pick some up on my way out to Tampa on Thursday because I’m pretty sure my local one has yellow. If not then idk wtf I’m gonna do ugh.

momokurumi:

ciciascloset:

Yesterday I was having a lot of problems with my bobbin tension because I bought some new bobbins that don’t fit the same way the other’s fit (even though they’re both 15 >.>) so have a little interactive guide on how to troubleshoot tension problems. 

I’ll go a step further and tell you that you can change the tension on the bobbin (this is only on some machines that have a bobbin case) by tightening or loosening the screw on the bobbin case. The “Screw driver” that your using is the one the machine came with, My Brother back at Uni actually has one that looks like a screw driver and not a plate. However the plate is better in my opinion. 

Just make sure that if you’re making it looser you don’t make it so loose that the things comes apart. If it does sweep the area thoroughly grab some magnets and see if the magnets can pick it up.

The top image is from this site

I’m very very vERY anal about my thread tension on all of my machines, so reblogging in case it helps any other sewing peeps. Tension is important the check for each and every project, fabric, and thickness of fabrics. It can greatly affect your quality, garment strength, and prevent jamming if it is aligned properly. ^.^

The shipping gods have smiled upon me and my boots and gloves for TBCC have apparently been delivered. Praise be to Amazon.com!

dangerous-ladies:

going-home-to-gallifrey:

dangerous-ladies:

Look: these boots are very, very simple. Actually sewing them together is no problem once you’ve got it drafted. 

It is, essentially, a sock. A sock with a fancy cuff, with a sole glued to the bottom. It is also zipper-free. You are going to make a sock that fits over a shoe, and you are going to use a knife to peel off the edges of the sole, tuck the fabric under, and then glue the soles back in place so you have a nice, clean edge.

You will need:

  • Spandex fabric in whatever color you need.
  • Extra spandex fabric with the same amount of stretch for drafting your pattern.
  • Pattern paper.
  • A pair of ballet flats (or whatever shoe type you need.) Make sure you get the right “shape”; Supergirl’s boots, for example, have a pointed toe, and look out for sole color; we usually just go with black because anything else will get dirty/paint will chip. You also want to find one with an easily removed sole; as a general rule, the cheaper the shoe, the easier time you’ll have with it. We usually spend about $5 tops on our flats, haha. If you’re trying to do heels, be very, very cautious; if you damage the structural integrity of the shoe, you might be in some trouble when you need to walk on them. You also want to make sure they are as basic as possible; remove any bows and whatever possible.
  • An exacto knife.
  • Hot glue
  • Usual sewing implements; pins, scissors, rulers, whatever. 

You can draft it yourself easily: take your scrap fabric and wrap it around your leg as I’ve pictured above in the pink, and pin it along the back. You want to make it snug, but not so snug that you can’t get your foot out of it either. POINT YOUR TOE WHILE YOU DO THIS. Additionally, wear the shoe while you pin it around your foot; it’ll need to fit over the shoe in the end anyway. Don’t worry about the bottom of your foot; it’s easier if you make the curve under your heel snug, and the front of your toes, but you’re not going to be closing off the bottom.

When you have it pinned neatly and evenly, trim the edges down. Leave enough excess for seam allowance along the back, and enough for tucking on the bottom. (Tucking into the sole, that is.) Take it off your foot and you should have some weird shape (like a mirrored version of the pattern I have pictured above.)

Now: if you trace that onto pattern paper and smooth out any raggedness you may have made in cutting, you have your basic pattern. Then all you have to do is alter the top of the pattern: a /\ point for Wonder Woman, a V for Supergirl, etc. Because we’re making Supergirl, here, you’ll want it to be in two pieces, as shown in the pattern above. Wherever you cut to change the design, be sure that you add seam allowance (as you can see on our bottom pattern.) Also make sure that the top edge of your sock is snug enough to your calf that you won’t have to constantly bend to fix them.

I’ve taken pictures of my and Christine’s patterns. Obviously, if you don’t want a seam down the front, you need to cut the fabric on a fold. You will need four of the top cuff and two of the “sock”; the top cuff is two-layered so it’s got a clean top!

Sew all the cuffs: in the last picture, that’s what they should look like. First, sew them all at the back seam. Then layer them together to sew the top seam, so that when you fold them right-side out, you have finished cuffs as pictured. Topstitch whatever you want.

Sew the sock’s back seam.

Sew the cuff to the sock. Be very careful about the corners, so that they are sharp. Again, topstitch whatever works.

Use the exacto-knife to separate the shoe from the sole. Don’t take the whole sole off — you don’t want to pop it out of alignment, or compromise TOO much of the shoe’s integrity. You just need enough opened that you can tuck the bottom edge of your sock into the space between.

Once your whole sock is finished, it’s time for the crazy part: put it on, with your shoe. Then, with the help of a friend or with the acknowledgement that your spine will hurt trying to do it to yourself, start putting the bottom edge of the sock under the edge of the sole, and gluing in place. We have found hot glue works best because it hardens/sets fast: anything else and you may be stuck sitting there wearing your shoes for HOURS trying not to ruin your work.

Now you have boots.

Go kick some supervillain ass, girl.

maybe this could work for thigh-high boots at well? just use a bit of fashion tape to keep them up?

The problem with thigh-highs is that most people’s thighs continue to taper wider after the point where the thigh-highs stop, whereas the calf is typically wider than the spot just under the knee. The upper calf sort of acts as a natural narrowing point where the sock can cling to in order to avoid falling down… whereas the thigh can be a bit more difficult to fit :)

Fashion tape certainly works, but only if your fabric has enough vertical stretch (along your leg length-wise) to accommodate for the bend/flex of your knee. Building a thick elastic into the top of the boot tends to work better, but on some body types that can create a “muffin top” look on the thigh, so ymmv. 

Alternately, my favourite thing to do is to just build the thigh highs into leggings with flesh-coloured mesh so that the whole thing is a set of tights. That’s how I’ll be doing Supergirl’s N52 boots, eventually.

- Jenn

medievalpoc:

myrddin-emrys:

Disclaimer: This is not my own idea; I got the tip from the lovely Elentari-liv, who was kind enough to share her technique with me. This is only showing the basics I’ve used to knit the scales, not how to make any certain piece.
Also, keep in mind that I’m still a beginner at knitting. I’ve been doing it for approximately two weeks.
What you’ll need:
circular knitting needles
yarn
small scales
You’ll probably want to choose a yarn close to your scale colour, or one that complements it (I used a contrasting one here to make things easier to show). You may have to experiment a bit with the yarn gauge and size of the needles. I ended up using gauge three yarn and size six needles after some testing. Larger needles widened the gap between scales, so that the yarn was visible in between, which I didn’t want, and thicker yarn made the scales stick out too much as opposed to hanging. It looked like I was knitting a very ruffled dragon.
Scales can be purchased from The Ring Lord, with multiple choices of colour and material. I’ve experimented with both aluminum and steel; the steel seems to hang better because of its weight, but it all depends on what you need for your project!
(I’m putting the actual process under a read more because I do have a lot of photos.)
Read More

I’m gonna go ahead and put this under the resources tag for reenactors, cosplayers, Rennies and SCA-ers!

medievalpoc:

myrddin-emrys:

Disclaimer: This is not my own idea; I got the tip from the lovely Elentari-liv, who was kind enough to share her technique with me. This is only showing the basics I’ve used to knit the scales, not how to make any certain piece.

Also, keep in mind that I’m still a beginner at knitting. I’ve been doing it for approximately two weeks.

What you’ll need:

  • circular knitting needles
  • yarn
  • small scales

You’ll probably want to choose a yarn close to your scale colour, or one that complements it (I used a contrasting one here to make things easier to show). You may have to experiment a bit with the yarn gauge and size of the needles. I ended up using gauge three yarn and size six needles after some testing. Larger needles widened the gap between scales, so that the yarn was visible in between, which I didn’t want, and thicker yarn made the scales stick out too much as opposed to hanging. It looked like I was knitting a very ruffled dragon.

Scales can be purchased from The Ring Lord, with multiple choices of colour and material. I’ve experimented with both aluminum and steel; the steel seems to hang better because of its weight, but it all depends on what you need for your project!

(I’m putting the actual process under a read more because I do have a lot of photos.)

Read More

I’m gonna go ahead and put this under the resources tag for reenactors, cosplayers, Rennies and SCA-ers!

terranell:

beauty-360:

HOW TO: Applying False Eyelashes
Learning to apply lashes can be a difficult task for beginners, so today I’m going to tell you a few tips on how to apply them quickly and easily.
Don’t get discouraged. It can take many attempts before you’ll be able to put them on successfully. Visit your local beauty store and get a few pairs of the cheap kinds- since these will be just for practice.
Make sure you use a good lash glue. Clear or colored lash glues generally work the best.
Cut your lashes to the right size for your eyes! I cannot stress this enough. Your lashes should never go past the end of your eyelids.
Put mascara on. You want to do this before you apply false lashes so they blend better.
Apply some of the lash glue onto a q-tip, then run your lash over the glue. Sometimes, trying to put glue directly onto the lash can be a bit messy. Wait 10-20 seconds for the glue to get tacky.
Use either your fingers or tweezers to place them as close to your lash line as possible. It’s okay if it’s not exact.
Get a damp q-tip and use it to push your lash into place. Slightly damp q-tips will allow you to get it exactly where you want it without them sticking to you.
Use tweezers to pinch them onto your natural lash line. Be very careful that you don’t accidentally pinch your own lid or rip out an eyelash. I recommend slanted tweezers for this.
Let them dry and adjust to how they feel. False lashes can feel weird the first  time you wear them, so make sure you give yourself time to get used to it.
Practice. You probably wont get it right the first time, but that’s okay. Just be patient and you’ll get the hang of it.
Once you’ve learned how to apply them, I recommend using good quality lashes such as the ones by Ardelle or Andrea. For glue, Duo is always a good brand- though any clear glue will do just fine.
Good luck!

The falsie game is always traumatic for someone in my hotel room (usually me) so I’m reblogging this for everyone that feels my frustration.

terranell:

beauty-360:

HOW TO: Applying False Eyelashes

Learning to apply lashes can be a difficult task for beginners, so today I’m going to tell you a few tips on how to apply them quickly and easily.

  1. Don’t get discouraged. It can take many attempts before you’ll be able to put them on successfully. Visit your local beauty store and get a few pairs of the cheap kinds- since these will be just for practice.
  2. Make sure you use a good lash glue. Clear or colored lash glues generally work the best.
  3. Cut your lashes to the right size for your eyes! I cannot stress this enough. Your lashes should never go past the end of your eyelids.
  4. Put mascara on. You want to do this before you apply false lashes so they blend better.
  5. Apply some of the lash glue onto a q-tip, then run your lash over the glue. Sometimes, trying to put glue directly onto the lash can be a bit messy. Wait 10-20 seconds for the glue to get tacky.
  6. Use either your fingers or tweezers to place them as close to your lash line as possible. It’s okay if it’s not exact.
  7. Get a damp q-tip and use it to push your lash into place. Slightly damp q-tips will allow you to get it exactly where you want it without them sticking to you.
  8. Use tweezers to pinch them onto your natural lash line. Be very careful that you don’t accidentally pinch your own lid or rip out an eyelash. I recommend slanted tweezers for this.
  9. Let them dry and adjust to how they feel. False lashes can feel weird the first  time you wear them, so make sure you give yourself time to get used to it.
  10. Practice. You probably wont get it right the first time, but that’s okay. Just be patient and you’ll get the hang of it.

Once you’ve learned how to apply them, I recommend using good quality lashes such as the ones by Ardelle or Andrea. For glue, Duo is always a good brand- though any clear glue will do just fine.

Good luck!

The falsie game is always traumatic for someone in my hotel room (usually me) so I’m reblogging this for everyone that feels my frustration.

Anonymous asked
y u have surprise? You're the queen of hell! Of course you're a cosplay hero! Real, no tv weirdness!

You are best thank you Anon.

Anonymous asked
Aaahhh!! The chance to meet one of my cosplay heroes is making me overjoyed!

I-I’m someone’s cosplay hero??